BEE BUTT

I play the autoharp and sing songs.

"BLESSED ARE THE HAPPY-GO-LUCKY GIRLS AND BOYS." - KURT VONNEGUT

Student at grocery store with his parents: This was my English teacher. All the kids at school call her The Hippie.
Me: What?

nprbooks:

If you haven’t read Emily Carroll’s shiveringly glorious Through the Woods, our reviewer Amal El-Mohtar recommends you do so immediately:’

In these five graphic tales (meaning comics, not stories told in Grand Guignol fashion — although that linguistic line is definitely blurred here),Carroll’s sinuous prose and emphatic art blend seamlessly into a path through the stories she tells. If there is a key to this collection, it is the phrase “It came from the woods. (Most strange things do),” which recurs in “His Face All Red,” the story of a man who murders his brother only to see him emerge from the woods whole, happy, and unscathed. These are tales of strange things that come from or go into the woods — and what they did to people, or had done to them, along the way.

"His Face All Red" is actually available online — but if you want to see what exactly this lady is running from, you’ll have to get the book:


Through the Woods is complex without being opaque; these are all still clear, deceptively simple stories that are kissing-close to beginning with “once upon a time.” They’re stories about girls who lose a father to the winter, a mother to sickness, a friend to a ghost; they’re stories told as straightforwardly as fairy tale while containing all the rich density of poetry.
I am still not a reader of horror. But I am a reader of poetry, of folk and fairy tales, of dark fantasy, and a frequent wanderer of woods — and as such, I am most certainly a reader of Carroll. 

nprbooks:

If you haven’t read Emily Carroll’s shiveringly glorious Through the Woods, our reviewer Amal El-Mohtar recommends you do so immediately:’

In these five graphic tales (meaning comics, not stories told in Grand Guignol fashion — although that linguistic line is definitely blurred here),Carroll’s sinuous prose and emphatic art blend seamlessly into a path through the stories she tells. If there is a key to this collection, it is the phrase “It came from the woods. (Most strange things do),” which recurs in “His Face All Red,” the story of a man who murders his brother only to see him emerge from the woods whole, happy, and unscathed. These are tales of strange things that come from or go into the woods — and what they did to people, or had done to them, along the way.

"His Face All Red" is actually available online — but if you want to see what exactly this lady is running from, you’ll have to get the book:

Through the Woods is complex without being opaque; these are all still clear, deceptively simple stories that are kissing-close to beginning with “once upon a time.” They’re stories about girls who lose a father to the winter, a mother to sickness, a friend to a ghost; they’re stories told as straightforwardly as fairy tale while containing all the rich density of poetry.

I am still not a reader of horror. But I am a reader of poetry, of folk and fairy tales, of dark fantasy, and a frequent wanderer of woods — and as such, I am most certainly a reader of Carroll. 

My lady’s fat, she’s ugly, she’s fat and she’s ugly, but I love her, I love her, I really really love her.

King Khan & the Shrines - Took My Lady To Dinner (via youandme-aretautology)

King Khan and The Shrines

—Took My Lady to Dinner

supahappyfuntime:

King Khan and The Shrines — Took My Lady to Dinner

Happy birthday to my beautiful sister-in-law! Abby makes me smarter just by hanging around, and I love that she is always fighting in my corner. She’s a boss ass bitch if I ever met one.

Happy birthday to my beautiful sister-in-law! Abby makes me smarter just by hanging around, and I love that she is always fighting in my corner. She’s a boss ass bitch if I ever met one.